back to top

(Source: velorums, via langleav)

ignorance-of-pride:

basedgodsboner:

afrogrrrlxvx:

latenightwithicewaterjones:

cultureunseen:

Salute to the enduring spirit of the children of the slaves…

A lot of the men and women that had to endure this are still alive. Don’t let white people act like this is the distant past. It’s not.

^

(via ringdingdingdong)

Art history meme (x) - 5/6 themes - White dresses

kanrose:

iammakingperfectsense:

insidemymmind:

Okay, so in Science class yesterday we were talking about sleep cycles and melatonin and my science teacher said, “if you’re trying to sleep, avoid one colour. Blue. Your melatonin levels decrease when looking at the colour blue because it’s the colour of the sky.” GUYS, I KNOW WHY NONE OF US SLEEP. TUMBLR IS BLUE.

image

THE JIG IS UP, YOU SNEAKY BASTARDS. WE’RE ONTO YOU.

(via steamingmugs)

i-need-that-seat:

iapollogise:

I love pirates because they have no concept on albeism. oh you have no leg? here have a peg leg. no hand?? well guess we gotta put a hook on that, give those sons of bitches a surprise. Blind in one eye, put an eyepatch on no one fucking cares, youre deaf??? go man the canons you glorious bastard.They dont care if youre disabled bcus as long as you can fuck shit up they literally dont fucking care.

I never thought about it this way. This is beautiful.

(via andwhisperstalesofmary)

But what makes Jaime so compelling, and so worthy of our continued attention, is this fact: Despite the horrible things he’s done, he knows who and what he is. He’s actually a lot like Tyrion, in that he’s aware that people have pre-judged him, and as a result, he wears his cynicism like armor. But Jaime is hated not just because he killed a king, but because he’s a living, breathing symbol of something the people of Westeros don’t want to face: He’s a reminder that their system is full of unreconcilable contradictions. How could he continue to serve a king who was roasting alive those who served him and slaughtering the innocent smallfolk? Where was the honor in that? It’s a valid question that lots of people in Westeros don’t want to face.

In his view, Jaime embraced a larger truth that allowed him to forsake his vow and kill his king. He did what nobody else was willing to do and which arguably needed to be done; in way, he made a sacrifice for Westeros. But everyone would rather preserve their ideals about what honor means — and for good reason. If the system of kings, lords and bannermen (a system in which some good people do real good in their communities) were to fall, what would follow? It’s highly unlikely that a fairer, more just Westeros would emerge from the ashes, almost certainly not in the short term.

Most people stick to the system they’ve always known — and hate Jaime as a result — because the alternatives are terrifying.

— Maureen Ryan, The Huffington Post. Review of ‘A Man Without Honor’ Game of Thrones. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/maureen-ryan/game-of-thrones-recap_b_1513588.html?ref=fb&src=sp&mimi=1&comm_ref=false (via kelicus)

(via andwhisperstalesofmary)